Taking Caution in Cloud Security

Posted on Nov 21, 2018
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CLOUD SECURITY MISSTEPS

HOW TO AVOID COMMON SECURITY PITFALLS.

Cloud computing remains shrouded in mystery for the average American. The most common sentiment is, “It’s not secure.” Few realize how many cloud applications they access every day: Facebook, Gmail, Uber, Evernote, Venmo, and the list goes on and on… People flock to cloud services for convenient solutions to everyday tasks. They are so easy to start using that consumers rarely think twice about setting up an account or downloading a new app.

Regardless of whether you acknowledge it, cloud usage incurs risk to your personal information. The data breaches in the news have much worse repercussions than just the need to reset your password. Cloud usage from your phone or computer may expose your data to criminal hackers who sell the information on the black market, or Darkweb.

TAKE HEED OF THESE COMMON CYBER SECURITY PITFALLS:

Misstep: You lost control of your data because of the fine print in a user agreement. Solution: Many cloud services claim ownership of any uploaded data, even after you delete your account. These tricky rules are hidden in plain sight in the terms and conditions.

Misstep: You sent out a public link to a Google Doc so others could view and edit.

Solution: Creating a public link is a convenient way to share a common document, but this means literally anyone who guesses the link can view the document. You may not care about your grocery list getting loose on the internet, but even documents like a party-planning sheet may have your address or other information you want to keep private. To restrict access, invite email addresses instead.

Misstep: You granted an application every permission under the sun.

Solution: Applications request authorization for device permissions, but sometimes these can overstep boundaries. Be discerning when services seem to overstep their bounds by requesting access to contacts or even your camera, for example. These permissions can cost you money by making phone calls, violate privacy, or make a malicious attack more dangerous. Look out for permissions that seem unnecessary for the application’s function.

Misstep: You use the same password for every app on your phone.

Solution: The previous tip discussed how attackers can gain access to your sensitive information by guessing or using a stolen password. Don’t make it easy for them! If you use the same password for all online services, a breach at Twitter may give attackers entrance into your bank, Amazon, and corporate email accounts. Use a password manager to minimize the damage in the event a single service gets breached.

 

Article retrieved from Cloud Tweaks.

A recent trend in the cybersecurity industry has removed the “blame” of security failures from technology users and shifted the focus to making security easy. With that in mind, there are simple choices people make online that affect the likelihood of becoming a victim to cybercrime.