7 May

Citon Partner Highlighted in WIRED Magazine for Healthcare Security

Posted

In an interview with WIRED Magazine, Scott Erven, Essentia Health’s head of security, revealed the daunting world of hacking vulnerability in hospitals today.

Erven explained the opportunities that exist for hackers to manipulate digital medical records, hack defibrillators and alter temperatures of refrigerators that store blood samples and temperature-sensitive medications.

“Many hospitals are unaware of the high risk associated with these devices,” Erven told the publication. “Even though research has been done to show the risks, healthcare organizations haven’t taken notice. They aren’t doing the testing they need to do and need to focus on assessing their risks.”

Scott Erven works as the point of contact for Citon’s security-related solutions partnership with Essentia Health. Erven spoke at the 2013 Vital Technology Expo, co-sponsored by Citon Computer Corp. 

Read the rest of the article here: http://www.wired.com/2014/04/hospital-equipment-vulnerable/

 

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To learn more about how Citon’s security solutions can help your organization, contact Jon Heyesen, Director of Business Development, at 218.720.4435.

5 May

Report: 30 Percent of Consumers Wouldn’t do Business After Security Breach

Posted

A new report indicates roughly 30 percent of consumers would abandon a business or organization after a security breach.

The report focuses on the financial, healthcare and retail industries, reflecting concern across the board.  Data was compiled through surveys conducted in October 2013 by Javelin Strategy and Research.

Respondents to the survey indicated they would be most distrustful of the retail industry after a security breach, with 33 percent saying they would not likely do business with the entity again.

Thirty percent of respondents indicated they would not return to a healthcare provider after a security breach, and 24 percent said they would no longer trust a financial institution.

“Today, regardless of whether they occur in the financial, healthcare, or retail industries, data breaches have an undeniable impact on a business’s image, and in turn, both the revenue and expense side of its bottom line,” the report’s conclusion states.

 

For information on how to assess possible IT security threats to your business or organization, contact the Citon IT security team:





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1 May

IT Security Breaches Reach Nearly 200 Million in 3 Months

Posted

The latest SafeNet Breach Level Index indicates nearly 200 million records were stolen from January through March of this year, representing a more than 230 percent increase in IT security breaches over this time last year.

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The latest round of reports shows 58 percent of IT Security attacks came from malicious outsiders – malicious insiders accounted for nearly 13 percent of attacks.

Top industries for IT security compromises included financial, technology, retail, government and healthcare sectors.

“Not all breaches are created equal. Breaches are no longer a binary proposition where an organization either has or hasn’t been breached,” the SafeNet website states. “Instead, they are wildly variable – having varying degrees of fallout – from breaches compromising global networks of highly sensitive data to others having little to no impact whatsoever.”

The Breach Level Index is measured by publicly disclosed breaches and individual organization risk assessments.

For information on how to assess possible IT security threats to your business or organization, contact the Citon IT security team:





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28 April

Internet Explorer Bug Leaves Browser Users Open to Attacks

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Security Firm FireEye announced this weekend the discovery of a “zero day” vulnerability in most versions of Internet Explorer.

The vulnerability allows a malicious website or advertisement to use Adobe Flash with Internet Explorer to run code on users’ machines. Hackers are able to lure users to click on a link directed at an attack website, which then gives hackers control over the user’s PC, according to a Microsoft security advisory.

“An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could gain the same user rights as the current user,” the Microsoft security advisory states. “Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than users who operate with administrative user rights.”

This is the first major bug in Windows XP that will not be patched by Microsoft.

This is the start of the “XPocalypse.” Those still running XP are urged to stop using Internet Explorer. Installing Chrome or Firefox won’t keep users safe forever, but it will buy time.

For supported versions of Windows, Microsoft should have a patch out no later than May 12. In the meantime, you can protect yourself by:

  • Using an alternate web browser like Chrome of Firefox. Internet Explorer may be needed for some internal applications that only support Internet Explorer.
  • Disabling Adobe Flash in Internet Explorer.
  • Installing the Enhanced Mitigation Toolkit, version 4.1, from Microsoft: https://support.microsoft.com/kb/2458544

 

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23 April

Protecting Your Digital Assets

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The numbers don’t lie. Businesses are under attack as criminals work to compromise systems and steal intellectual property. Here’s a short video that will help you understand the current threat landscape and assist you in your decision to protect your digital assets.





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